Comparisons

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Chengdu Blogs, Comparisons, Cultural, Discover Chinese culture, Learn about China

China and Italy : Two Sides of the Same Coin?

Ciao! My name is Ferdinando and I am one of the office interns here in Chengdu. I come from Torino, a lovely city just a short drive away from the Italian Alps. I have now been in Chengdu for almost a month, but it honestly feels like I have been here an entire lifetime! The atmosphere and energy of this laid-back metropolis have completely won me over, and I could definitely imagine myself living here one day.As the days have passed, I have found myself more and more at ease in this new environment. I’ve started asking myself a simple question: Why? Why is it so easy for me to dive into and settle in this very different and complex culture, while with so many others I have a more challenging time? After some pondering over many hot bowls of dandan noodles, I have realised that the reason for my rapid acclimatization was that Chinese culture is, in fact, not so distant from my own Italian culture after all.The obvious starting point of this comparison is food: both Italians and Chinese are passionate about their food and possess very complex and proud eating cultures. Due to its abundance of strong flavours and “exotic” ingredients (such as chicken feet and pig brains!), traditional Chinese cuisine can seem threatening to Western palates. However, after a few days of rumbling stomachs, foreigners will get to know and appreciate the incredible richness of this wonderful culinary tradition. I am a great fan of Chinese food myself, and I believe that, upon my departure, the thing I will miss the most of Chengdu will be its succulent chuanchuan houses and its authentic noodle corner-shops.Another main point of contact between our two cultures is the paramount importance we both give to family and tradition. While strolling by Chengdu’s People Park, it is possible to see old grandparents practising Taichi with their young nephews, just as my grandparents used to play football with a young me in Torino’s parks. In addition, in the numerous large family gatherings I have seen in Chengdu’s hotpot restaurants I see the reflection of my own “extended family” lunches, that could last anywhere between three to six hours. I am of the opinion that this strong sense of community and belonging, typical of both Italian and Chinese families, not only creates deeper family and friendship ties, but also enhances your sense of cultural awareness. Thus making it easier to “jump over” the cultural divide at hand.A third similarity I have observed between Italy and China, especially in regards to Chengdu, is their common relaxed, “dolce far niente” approach to life. I have surprisingly found that the concept of being on time is exceptionally similar both in Italy and China, so that my canonical five-minute lateness is not only accepted (unlike in England), but almost encouraged! Although Chengdu still is a bustling, work-oriented metropolis, somehow its citizens manage to maintain a hands-off approach to both their professional and personal lives. This makes this city the perfect spot to jumpstart an ambitious, yet stress-free career.

I believe many other cultural analogies can be found between Italy and China, but that is not the point of this post. The point is, in my opinion, more important to underline and point out the existence of such similarities – as comparison brings recognition, recognition brings acceptance, and acceptance brings friendship. In other words, the purpose of this post is to highlight that, no matter where you are from and where you go, as long as you seek similarities and avoid division, you will find it easier to “jump over” the cultural divide and feel at home anywhere around the world. Therefore, this is the main advice I can give to new interns coming to China: seek the familiar in the foreign and the foreign will look familiar.

All You Need to Know, Before your stay, Comparisons, Discover Chinese culture, Eating out in Zhuhai, Food, Learn about China, Things To Do in Zhuhai, Travel

Harbin vs Zhuhai

How I ended up in the “City of Ice”

As a student of Business Management and Mandarin, I had to make a choice of city in China for my year abroad. The year abroad, in my case, consists of two components: one year study and a two month internship. I decided early that I wanted to study in one city and do an internship in a different city, for different experiences.

North vs South

Originally, I was very keen on studying in a city in the southern part of China, for many reasons that include: climate, food, proximity to the sea, and much more. As a Portuguese person, I searched for a similar place to go to (and to make the cultural shock a little less noticeable!), However, it went a little different than expected (in a good way!).

I applied and was accepted for a one-year Confucius institute full scholarship in Harbin! The coldest city in China! This peculiar city in northeast China fulfilled my main criteria which was: must have majority Mandarin speakers, who speak in a standard way. My other criteria: I will study in a city where English is remotely spoken, so that I can have the best learning experience. I stuck to these two important criteria and must say, had a great experience learning Mandarin in Harbin.

How I ended up in the “City of romance”

When it came to apply for my internship, Zhuhai was already on my mind. I wanted a place different from Harbin. I wanted to feel the warmth of the sun again, and so I did for two months in the lovely city of Zhuhai. As expected these two cities are extremes in so many categories, that some may ask “Why did you go to Zhuhai/Harbin?”.

Let’s talk about some of those differences:

Architecture

For those who aren’t familiar with Harbin, it’s a city located in Heilongjiang Province right at the top right corner of China, bordering Russia’s Siberia. So, one can imagine just how cold it is. Harbin’s winter lasts about 6 months reaching minimum’s of – 40 º C. Harbin is, in fact “the City of Ice”, famous for it’s ice buildings and statues and icy festivals. Moreover, it’s important to point out, Russian entrepreneurs who wanted to recreate their motherland, built the Harbin of today. So its buildings are very Russian, in the way they look, but with Chinese banners. It’s this odd combination that makes it such a peculiar city, interesting on the foreign eye.

Zhuhai is the complete opposite. The buildings are tall, and mostly dark grey and white. While it sounds depressing, it goes well with the city’s landscape. Zhuhai is relaxing on the eye, because it is a mixture of human landscape and nature. Wherever you go you’re sure to see trees, bushes, anything that screams Nature.

Harbin’s Architecture is heavily influenced by Russia

Zhuhai’s main focus point is the balance between human landscape and nature

Food

Beifang’s food (North China) and Nanfang’s food (South China) is completely different. Not only that, but also it varies according to the region.

Harbin’s food is delicious, flavored and mostly fried. But I couldn’t understand why most food was fried. Until a teacher explained that due to the extreme cold weather in Harbin, there was a preference for oil-based food (it will heat your body and help fight coldness). Zhuhai’s food is light, flavored and with a lot more vegetable side dishes. Both are not too spicy, so both Harbin and Zhuhai’s food are very delicious.

Harbin’s cuisine
Zhuhai’s cuisine

Meeting Foreigners

That was, for me, the biggest difference between the two. While in Harbin, Chinese people tend to be more amazed whenever they see a foreigner for the first time. Nevertheless they are very welcoming and overall very curious about the countries we come from. They may even ask for a picture.

Zhuhai’s people may also be amazed, but are much more relaxed when meeting foreigners. Overall, I found that a large portion of people in Zhuhai can speak basic english while no one in Harbin could. I imagine the proximity to both Macau and Hong Kong, two ex-colonies and now special administrative regions (SAR) played an important role in this.

My veredict

Harbin and Zhuhai are two very different cities in so much more aspects other than the one’s I have listed. That is the fun part and makes my first time in China so special. I highly recommend visiting both north and south china and deciding which one provides for the the most enjoyable experience.

Chinese-Food-VS-Western-Food-
Comparisons, Eating Out in Chengdu, Food

Chengdu’s Finest Western Food

As is often the case during the transition of relocating abroad, one of the most daunting factors within this process can be the change in diet. Coming towards the end of my second month here in Chengdu and third year collectively in China I can safely say that it is indeed that little bit of comfort in the form of a meal that offers that much needed taste of home. Therefore, as a self-confessed ‘foodie’ to make life a little easier I am going to layout where I feel are the best places to go, how to get there and how they compare in terms of price and quality:

 

Peter’s Tex Mex

 

Although this is possibly the oldest and one of the most well-known western food chains in Chengdu as well as Beijing, do not be fooled by the fact that there are several locations across the city. This was in fact the first place I visited for a western meal and I can honestly say that I left needing to be carried home bearing a full smile which is a rarity. From nachos, to pizza, to Mexican food and even all things sweet I was very impressed with the quality and variety of food here which came to roughly 400 RMB between me and a friend allowing us to have a nice banquet. If you are keen on a tipple, there are also some western lagers and the freshly made margaritas pack a real punch!

Where ?

12 East Tongzilin Rd/桐梓林东路12号

 

Redbeard

 

To say these burgers are good is an understatement. Out of my three years in China, the burger selection is definitely one of the best I have ever had. Redbeard (an American expat) sources high quality ingredients (Aussie beef namely) for his seriously decadent menu that plates up everything from gargantuan buffalo burgers to classic beef delights layered in different kinds of cheese. He also offers seriously decadent smothered fries and you can wash them down with craft beers.

I find it hard to pick a favourite (although the ‘mutton chops’ comes close) and I’ve tried a fair few. The burgers are definitely on the pricy side but you really know where your money goes – servings are huge and quality is outstanding. They are also now available for delivery !

Where ?

29 Zijing Donglu, Chengdu/成都紫荆东路29号

 

Wagas

 

Although this is quite a popular chain across China, I feel that avocado and brunch is continuing to prosper amongst us and it is on that basis that Wagas deserves a try as well as the reasonable prices. To put it simply, the elegance and nostalgia associated with a poached egg done properly when thousands of miles away from home really is a welcomed luxury over here, especially when factored in with the ‘lighter’ choices including kale, feta, and so on for the more health conscious.

Located in the scenic area of TaiKoo Li, Wagas offers the chance to sit back, relax and take in the wonderful surroundings with the outside seating area and a wide selection of juices to compliment it !

Where ?

TaiKoo Li Chengdu, L1/ 1345  中纱帽街8号成都远洋太古里L1 – 1345

 

Mike’s Pizza Kitchen

 

No matter where you are from and where you may be in the world, I think it is fair to say that the overwhelming majority of us all speak the language of ‘pizza’ due to the liberty of adding your own personal touch. At Mike’s, not only do you get the option of base, toppings, sauce and so on but every single element is of the highest quality.

The quality is in fact so good that you will be unable to eat here without a prior reservation and can only order delivery at an allocated time relative to your location. Nevertheless, when in Chengdu if you’re talking pizza then you must be talking Mike’s because I am yet to have tried one as good in the UK, let alone China.

Where ?

4 Tongzilin Lu Ste. 7/桐梓林路4号附7号 – Just look for the Big, Blue “M”

 

Bucciano Italian

 

“From the Heart of Tuscany to the tastebuds of Chengdu” is a perfect fit for the motto of this wonderful restaurant as you are taken on a culinary journey from the southwest to the more hills of Tuscany. This is nicely complimented by an array of stunning Italian wines that also reside there in the form of Bucciano’s own “The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne” brand.

As I’m sure you can imagine, although the choice of food and wine is endless rest assured that the majority of dishes are served with a generous lashing of Tuscany’s finest extra virgin olive oil coupled with traditional bread and vegetables to tick you over while you take in the ambience. From pizza to pasta, meat or seafood- you will not be disappointed !

Where ?

314 Block 3, Building B, Poly Center, 1 Jinxiu Road, Wuhou District ( Near to the Ping’an Bank, Yulin, North Kehua Road)/ 锦绣路1号保利中心B座3楼314室(玉林、桐梓林、科华北路、武侯区、平安银行附近)

 

Check out the full gallery below !

 

 

Interested ? – Apply now !

Comparisons, Learn about China, Qingdao Blogs, Things To Do in Qingdao

Basketball in China

Why does it have to be Basketball?

Did you ever want to do some extraordinary stuff that feels a little bit like being a celebrity without being one?  Or to see and go through cool and wonderful situations? Then China is the place to be! Today I am going to speak about one of these activities. We got free tickets for a basketball match between two University Teams. Actually a friend got them, and not only two, he got a lot, so we went there with a bunch of fellow students. I was really happy on one side getting the opportunity to see my first basketball match but on the other hand I would have preferred watching a football match instead. But basketball is much more popular in China.

Basketball match at Qingdao University

Why? If you ask a Chinese person this question they also don’t know. Football is also popular in China, and most people know at least one name of a German player, although they will use the Chinese name for him so you might not understand who it is they mean. For example you will have a Chinese guy smiling at you and say. “my favourite players are Kelinsiman or Shiweiyinshitaige!” Ok, so these examples are quite easy, but you will sometimes have a hard time I guarantee it.

Before the Match

But back to business! As a Student of Qingdao University, I was cheering for the Qingdao Team. I cheered so much that I even forgot the name of the other university, but is that information needed? I mean, who wants to know about the loser anyway?

Everything was new for me; first of all they were playing the national anthem before the game. Which is quite strange for a German to see, as we don’t play national anthems that often on sports events. Actually the only occasion on which we would play the German national anthem would be a match between national teams. Then they had two stadium speakers that were giving information about the teams and the game. The were announcing every single player by name.

After the introduction another, for me, strange thing happened. A group of cheerleaders came and performed on the field. Which was strange, because in Germany this is quite a seldom thing to happen too.  Actually, I only know about cheerleaders from American movies.

For me the idea of cheerleading is, using diplomatic terms now, quite a strange one. Why would you need a bunch of girls performing expressive dancing, to cheer up a crowd that came to see their team competing against another one anyway? And why are there no male cheerleaders? Or are there some at women’s sport events? And if so, what kind of clothes do they wear? Hot pants, with muscle shirts? What would they swing around?

During the Game

Anyway after the performance and a long time of people running around without any system visible, on and by the sides of the field the actual game begun. We had the best seats directly on the line of the field. The anticipation was killing me already, when the game started.

And I saw from what I can tell about basketball (which is not too much, because I never saw the need to gather knowledge about this game anyway) it was a good game. The players were dedicated and they really played with tactics. During half time, two of my fellow students had to perform a streetball game against two Chinese guys. In the end the Qingdao Team won with smashing 52:38 Points.

After all I was really happy with the whole experience and can strongly recommend this to everyone that gets the opportunity- go and get a grasp of Chinese basketball, with everything belonging to it, including the loud drums Chinese people seem to carry around with them like the vuvuzelas brought to a football match!

My friends and I at the Qingdao University basketball game

 

Comparisons, Learn about China

Is WeChat Pay Contributing to the Death of Cash Transactions?

In the two years between being an intern in Qingdao and being a Branch Manager here, plenty has changed. But the most striking change is probably the massive popularisation of digital wallets, the two most popular being Alipay (zhīfùbao 支付宝) and WeChat Pay (wēixìnzhīfù 微信支付). Digital wallets have yet to catch on to the same extent in the UK. Apple Pay is the most notable example, however it definitely does not have the same momentum as WeChat Pay does.

So How Does it Work?

Put simply, you link your Chinese bank card to your WeChat account. From there, you can either scan a shop’s QR code (China loves a QR code!) or the cashier can scan your own personal bar code. From there, you input the amount you have to pay, tap in your WeChat Pay password and, just like magic, your money is transferred immediately.

Wechat Pay QR code scan
It’s so simple to spend lots of money now! All you do is scan your QR code at the till.

I am not exaggerating when I say that WeChat pay is everywhere! From taxi drivers, fruit stalls and tiny noodle shops to supermarkets and car dealers, everyone now uses either WeChat Pay or Alipay, or even both! I have only come across one taxi driver who refused to accept it.

It solves the age old problem of how to split the bill. In Chinese, this is called AA制 (AA zhì). Before digital wallets were a thing, it was a hassle having the right change and juggling between you and your friends to make sure everyone paid their fair share. Now, in a very Chinese fashion, you can send your friends a digital 红包 (hóng bāo red packet) to pay them back for dinner.

Downsides

The only time I have found WeChat to be a pain was recently when my phone stopped working. On the first of every month, the packages of calls and data on Chinese phones refreshes. If you don’t have enough credit to refresh the package, your phone simply stops working until you top it up again. Becoming reliant on WeChat Pay was a nightmare in this situation, as I couldn’t connect to the internet to make any payments. To make matters worse, I only had 6RMB in my wallet! I couldn’t even get dinner, let alone buy a top up for my phone. I had to go home, connect to my home WiFi and top up my phone before I could access my WeChat Pay again.

So how does WeChat Pay affect the rest of China?

In just a few short years since their introduction into Chinese society, these digital wallets have become massively popular. According to a recent UN report, the value of payments made through WeChat pay has increased by a staggering eighty-five times, from RMB 0.1 trillion in 2012, to RMB 8.5 trillion in 2016. It is hardly surprising when WeChat is so integral to Chinese life. Most peoples’ social life online is conducted through WeChat, using the app to chat, organise events, find flatmates and even pay their taxes online!

A real upshot for the Chinese government as well is that the use of digital wallets has brought vast amounts of cash payments into easily recorded and traced digital transactions. This will potentially make it easier for tax authorities to keep track and collect taxes owed. In addition, it has the potential to bring more people into the economy. Those who are too far from banks, or are lacking the correct documentation to open a bank account where they live, can instead access the economy through their phone, taking advantage of China’s huge smartphone penetration.

The largest change on the street has been the near-extinction of cash. In restaurants, in cabs, in shops, I rarely see cash changing hands. Instead, people brandish smartphones and QR codes. It will be interesting to see how long this trend lasts.

For international payments, we always recommend using TransferWise. They’re cheaper than the banks, because they always use the real exchange rate – which you can see on Google – and charge a very small fee. They’re also safe and trusted by over 2 million people around the world. You can sign up here.

 

Comparisons, Cultural, Qingdao Blogs

A British, Afghan intern in China.

A little insight into my life in China…

forbidden city in Beijing
Forbidden City vibes- InternChina

Coming to intern in China was never a daunting prospect for me as I had previously visited China a few times, so it felt almost natural to come back and complete a 3 months’ internship. The only obstacle was trying to persuade my parents to let me travel all the way to Asia on my own again but this time for 3 months rather than a 2-week holiday.

Qingdao
First month interning in Qingdao-InternChina

forbidden city
The doors at the Forbidden city were worthy of taking a selfie against- InternChina

Coming from an Asian background (Afghanistan specifically), one would think it wouldn’t be a huge deal for my parents to accept my decision in wanting to intern in another Asian country. However, knowing I would be living in a city I have never visited before genuinely worried them. I suppose what made them feel comfortable in knowing I was going to be safe was that I would have InternChina to rely on in case I felt in any way unhappy or unsafe. But being in Qingdao, the most dangerous thing I’ve come across these past three months has been trying not to cry whilst eating spicy food. Whereas, if this was London, by 11PM I would question and wonder if I should go home yet so I do not face any dangers that we, women, are constantly told to watch out for. I have had the privilege of travelling to many countries and nowhere makes me feel more safe and protected the way China does.

resort
Infinity pool at a resort in Qingdao- InternChina

great wall of china
Just hanging out on the Great Wall, what did you do on Saturday? -InternChina

Culturally, China is not so different from Central Asian countries like Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. We all have a big tea drinking culture. We enjoy sharing our food. We consider family to be our main priority. But most importantly respect and kindness to be shown to visitors. Chinese culture is so rich and pure that it has allowed me to feel at home so far away from home. I would wholeheartedly recommend interning in China, as you learn about a culture first hand and experience a way of living life very differently to your own.

Italian dinner at our apartment
Italian dinner at our apartment- InternChina

 

When it comes to the business aspects of China, the culture is very different to the Western and Central Asian way of life. Only that in China, networking is incredibly important and making connections with whomever you can is the norm. Also, their work hours are somewhat longer but more laid back, as they take their time to complete a task rather than work to a deadline.

cafe in Qingdao
Business hours in a cool cafe? Always fun -InternChina

Being an intern in InternChina has been interesting as I have been given many different responsibilities which would be deemed too high for an intern in the U.K. We are treated more as colleagues than interns which I think is great, not only for our self confidence but knowing we have the ability to perform as well as an employee. It also helps open doors to our futures because being given tasks we would not normally complete allows us to challenge and stimulate our time. Here’s our intern Joe giving us 6 reasons on why we should intern in China (although I could give you many more reasons as to why you should intern here)!

Red Thingy
Lunchtime at work- InternChina

My final words; yolo, come and experience China.

(check out the IC Instagram and you will understand why people consider China  to be travel goals)

Qingdao branch peeps
With my Qingdao IC team – InternChina

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Chinese Traditions, Comparisons, Cultural, Discover Chinese culture, Eating Out in Chengdu, Eating out in Zhuhai, Food, Qingdao Eating Out Guide

Chinese Breakfast vs. Western Breakfast

One of the most notable differences between Chinese and Western cuisine is breakfast. When most westerners think of breakfast, images of toast, cereal, pastries, eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee come to mind. In China, breakfast is a whole different ball game. A major difference in Chinese cuisine is the lack of dairy. Milk, cheese, butter and yogurt are not staples in Chinese cuisine and often aren’t readily available in smaller markets and grocery stores. So many Western breakfast staples aren’t eaten often here. Chinese breakfast is usually savory and people don’t shy away from stronger flavors such as preserved eggs, pickles, and spicy oil to eat first thing in the morning. Many people go out for breakfast and grab a quick bite to eat on the way to work or school. Street vendors will open up early to sell their goods to passing commuters – always at a very cheap price!
Below I’ve listed some of the most common breakfast foods in our cities. This, however, is only a sampling of what options are out there – especially for the more adventurous eaters. So get your taste buds ready, and before you know it you will be a Chinese breakfast convert!

粥  Zhōu (Congee)
Zhōu (congee) is a popular breakfast dish, which can be eaten all over China, but especially in southern China. Usually made of rice, although there are variations made with cornmeal, millet, sorghum, etc., zhōu is similar to oatmeal or porridge. Zhōu, however, is not sweetened and instead of adding sugar or fruit as a topping, popular toppings include zhàcài (pickled vegetables), salted eggs, soy sauce, and bamboo shoots to name a few. Yóutiáo, (long, deep fried dough) is often served as an accompaniment to zhōu.

InternChina – Zhou with Youtiao

馒头  Mántou (Steamed Buns)
Another very popular breakfast food in China is mántou. The classic mántou is white and made from wheat flour, though they come in various shapes and forms. Fresh from the steamer, mántou are soft and pillowy, and make for a great breakfast or midday snack. In northern China, often times mántou will be served with a meal instead of rice, and grilled mántou are one of my favorite street barbecue items.

InternChina – Mantou

包子、饺子  Bāozi, Jiǎozi (Steamed Bao, Dumplings)
Dumplings are also a classic Chinese breakfast. Bāozi are large steamed dumplings you can eat straight out of your hand. They are usually filled with minced meat or vegetables, though some have sausage, egg and other goodies inside. Jiǎozi are smaller steamed or boiled dumplings you eat with chopsticks and dip into a vinegar and soy sauce mixture – and of course as much spice as you want.

InternChina – Baozi

煎饼  Jiānbǐng (Fried Pancake Wrap)
Jiān bǐng is a common breakfast food that is popular all over China. Similar to a French crepe, jiān bǐng are always made to order, and usually filled with egg, hoisin sauce, chili paste, scallions and báocuì (fried, crispy cracker).

InternChina – Jianbing

肠粉  Chángfěn (Rice Noodle Roll)
Chángfěn is found in southern China – more specifically in the Guangdong province, and is definitely a staff favorite here in InternChina. For those lucky enough to be in Zhuhai, every morning you will walk past huge trays of steaming metal contraptions, with cooks churning out chángfěn faster than you can blink. Chángfěn is made from rice milk that is mixed with minced pork and egg, then steamed on large metal sheets. The resulting steamed rice noodle is then scraped onto a plate and covered in sweet soy sauce. Chángfěn may not sound appealing, and it definitely doesn’t win a beauty award, but is by far one of the best breakfast foods to be found in China! So if you’re coming to Zhuhai, make sure to give it a try.

InternChina – Changfen

And of course, no breakfast is complete without a cup of dòujiāng (豆浆), fresh warm soy milk, to go along with it!

Comparisons, Cultural, Qingdao Blogs, Travel, Zhuhai Blogs

2 Cities, 1 Unforgettable Experience

Selecting an IC internship destination can be a truly daunting task. How can one possibly choose between panda central, tropical beach paradise, and the beautiful mountains of the north?! Fortunately, as an office intern, I have been given the wonderful opportunity to experience life in two of IC’s beautiful cities: Qingdao and Zhuhai!
Now for the ultimate question, “Which one more preferable?”. Well, of course the answer to that question is going to differ from person to person, but I can share a bit of my experience to give you a better idea of life in both cities.
 

TRANSPORTATION

Qingdao and Zhuhai have excellent transportation systems. You can navigate the cities easily with your bus cards.

Now for some pros and cons for both cities.

Qingdao Pros:
• The majority of buses charge only 1 RMB!! Going to and from work only cost me $0.30 a day!
• Adding money to your bus card is extremely easy – just stop by a kehao and have one of the workers behind the counter help you top it up.

Qingdao Cons:
• Heading to and from work can be a bit of a challenge if you’re on a popular route. Prepare to feel like canned sardines.
• Qingdao rush-hour can double the time it takes you to get home.

But don’t let these cons scare you away! Just pop in your headphones, check your email, or engage in some mindful meditation. Your commute home can be an excellent time to multitask!

Zhuhai Pros:
• Hello breathing room! You tend to have more space on public transportation in Zhuhai.
• Are you looking to get out of China for the weekend with your multiple entry visa? Hop on a bus headed to Gongbei and spend the day in Macau!

Zhuhai Cons:
• 2-3 RMB each way, rather than 1 in Qingdao
• Adding money can be a bit more difficult. You sometimes have to go to the bus station to top up your card.

**If you are more of a subway/metro person, you might consider heading to Chengdu.**
 

WEATHER

Qingdao is located in northern China and tends to experience four seasons throughout the year. Zhuhai, on the other hand, is located in the south and has a more tropical climate. If you are headed to China in the summer, I would highly recommend going to Qingdao. The weather is hot, but not scorching. Zhuhai is the perfect winter get away. Who doesn’t love t-shirt weather in January?! I know I sure do!
 

TRAVEL

Both Qingdao and Zhuhai are excellent for those looking to do some traveling both in and outside China.

Qingdao
• 5 hour train ride to Beijing
• 6 hour train ride to Nanjing/Shanghai
• 1 hour flight to Seoul
• Great for a weekend trip to the Yellow Mountains

Zhuhai
• 15-30 minute taxi to Macau
• ~1 hour ferry to Hong Kong
• Get out of the city and experience more rural regions, such as the Yunnan Province in the west
• Spend a weekend in breathtaking Yangshuo
 
Interested in learning more about IC’s fantastic internship locations?! Check out the following Superblogs: Chengdu, Dalian, Qingdao, Zhuhai.

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