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Where to Find Foreign Food in Dalian

Living in China is all about trying various Chinese dishes from different parts of country, exploring new tastes and coming back to places where the food is outstanding. But sometimes we miss Western food, whether it is food from our own country or from another. Thanks to a large number of foreigners in most of China’s major cities, we can enjoy Western cuisine from different countries in many restaurants. Today, I want to introduce you some of the best (based on foreigners’ taste buds) Western restaurants in Dalian. Let’s start!

Brooklyn Bar and Restaurant 布鲁克林西餐厅 (Bùlǔkè lín xī cāntīng)

This place consists of everything what is called “Western food”. The menu combines modern creative and traditional authentic American food in a Brooklyn – styled restaurant. There, you can taste fresh home-made bread, sauces and sausages. Western atmosphere is maintained by the American owner – Wayne and English-speaking staff.

184 Bulao Jie Xigang District, Wanda Huafu 2nd floor, north of Huanghe Road, Dalian

大连市西岗区万达华府二期不老街184(不老街万达华府二期)

Indian Hut 印度人家餐厅 (Yìn duó rénjiā cāntīng)

Indian Hut with authentic Indian food prepared by an Indian chief. In this restaurant you can feel like in India not only by the food but also because of the décor. The menu has English and photos, so if you are not familiar with Indian food and the names do not tell you anything, you can choose by looking, though we “eat with our eyes”!

InternChina - Indian Hut

Kaisa Plaza B1, Tianjin Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian

大连市中山区天津街佳兆业底层二楼

Cafe Copenhagen

Here we can find European food, not only from Denmark but also Italian pizza and variety of other European dishes. This is a place good for brunch as well as for dinner, and their choice of desserts is mouth watering!

 

111 Tian Jin Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian

大连市中山区天津街111号修竹大厦1(近修竹街)

Blue Frog 蓝蛙 (Lán wā)

Famous among Dalian Ex pats as well as Locals for its burgers and cocktails but offers much more dishes from American cuisine. The restaurant has a really tempting offer buy one – get one free on burgers and drinks on Monday afternoon and DIY drinks during happy hour.

L40445 Pavilion Shopping Centre 4F, 129-3 Zhongshan Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian

大连市中山区中山路129-3地上四层L4045

Al Bacio 那之吻匹萨 (Nà zhī wěn pǐ sà)

Al Bacio is the most well – known for its real Italian pizza baked in the wood stove but it also has many kinds of Italian pasta and starters. You can combine the food with an Italian wine or freshly made fruit juice. The nice thing about the restaurant is that the kitchen is separated from the dining hall by glass wall, so the customers can watch their food being prepared.

No. 1, Floor 2, Unit 1, 375 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian

大连市中山区解放路3751单元121

Lenbach Restaurant & Bar 兰巴赫 (Lán Bāhè)

Restaurant offers German cuisine specialities in Dalian. Lenbach’s flagship dish is a traditional German sausage platter with mashed potatoes and sauerkraut. To enjoy your meal to the fullest it is best to have it with a pint of German craft beer.

L4030 Pavilion Shopping Centre 4F, 129-3 Zhongshan Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian

大连市中山区中山路129-3号柏威年购物中心L4030

Friday 星期五餐吧 (Xīngqíwǔ cān ba)

As Dalian was under Russian rule for a significant period of time in its history, there is much Russian heritage in the city. Besides many Russian accents in Dalian’s architecture, also places with Russian cuisine can be found. In Friday you can not only eat delicious Russian food but also feel the climate of Russia by the interior décor of the place.

208 Bulao Street, Xigang District, Dalian

大连市西岗区不老街208

Aux Petits Plaisirs 小乐趣 (Xiǎo lèqù)

Authentic French restaurant in Dalian with an energetic owner-chef Julien who prepares mouth watering meals as well as maintains friendly atmosphere, so the guests can feel at home. The restaurant has an interesting wine cellar to which guests can have access.

43 Zehui Road, Shahekou District, Dalian

大连市沙河口区泽汇街43

Euro – Bake 欧倍客 (Ōu bèi kè)

Cosy cafe & bakery in the heart of Labour Park – one of Dalian’s best attractions. Great for a bit of rest after walk in this lovely park or time spent on carousels and ferry wheel (underneath which it is located). Euro – Bake is famous for its wide range of cakes, pizza and bread followed by delicious coffee.

5 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian (inside the Labour Park)

大连市中山区解放路5劳动公园内

 

Want to check out Dalian’s Western restaurants? Why not Apply Now!

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Kunming Home for Christmas!

Although Christmas in Qingdao is great fun with its Christmas Markets and bright festive lights, one can not help but think of those warm sunny days when the Qingdao Wind wasn’t quite so nail-biting cold!  Therefore, if you have a couple of days to take off from your internship, then I would recommend heading down to the Yunnan Province to feel the warmth of the sun again!
After spending a fantastic 5 day Christmas vacation in Kunming and Lijiang. I have put together an action-packed 5-7-day itinerary plan to maximise your holiday:

Day 1: Travelling to Kunming

There are cheap flights from Qingdao to Kunming which can take up to 3-5 hours . Depending on the time you arrive, you can grab a taxi or the airport shuttle bus (25 RMB) to the city centre. Kunming is full of delicious restaurants, and while you are there I would recommend trying these local dishes:

 

Day 2: The Stone Forest

Some say that heading to Kunming without seeing the Stone Forest is a waste of a trip! The stone forest is a spectacular set of limestone pillars which look like petrified trees! They are part of the world heritage site and is representative of south China’s Karst landscape.

According to legend, the forest is the birthplace of Ashima (阿诗玛), a beautiful girl of the Yi people. After falling in love she was forbidden to marry her chosen suitor, and instead turned into a stone in the forest that still bears her name.

There are tour buses which run frequently daily to the Stone Forest, it takes about 2 hours and costs around 25RMB each way.

The Stone Forest
The Stone Forest

Day 3: Yunnan Nationalities Kunming, Guandu Ancient Town and Overnight Train

The Yunnan Nationalities Kunming is a must see! With a student card it costs around 90 RMB, and you can learn about the different cultures and 55 nationalities. You also have a chance to ride an elephant, watch performers and dress up in traditional costumes.

If you have time in the afternoon, visit the Guandu Ancient Town. It only takes about an hour to look around, but it is great fun to watch the locals sing and dance. There are lots of souvenirs, interesting buys, good food and snacks in a nice old architectural environment!

At around 9.30pm, take the overnight train to Lijiang. It is great fun especially if you are in a group together! I would recommend getting the soft sleeper bunk beds which costs around 260RMB, although it’s little bit more that other bunks, you are guaranteed a much better sleep! (Saying that, let’s hope you don’t have a baby with a fever in your carriage apartment like we did!)

Day 4: Lijiang Old Town

When you arrive in Lijiang the next day, although there are many fantastic hostels in the Old Town, I cannot recommend the October Inn enough! This hostel is just for international students,the manager Tommy speaks very good English, and I would recommend eating a home-cooked meal with the other guests around the cosy fireplace.

Make sure to go explore the Old Town and the Green lake (Tommy will give recommendations and tips on how to avoid paying tourist fares!) For the evening activities, there are some great bars in the area to go and visit!

Day 5: Tiger Leaping Gorge

Get up early the next day! We enjoyed Tommy’s amazing scrambled eggs with yak butter before boarding the bus for Tiger Leaping Gorge. For more information about this amazing 2-day hike, check out this blog.

Tiger Leaping Gorge Map
Tiger Leaping Gorge Map

As the route is popular, you will begin the walk with a bunch of people of all different ages and backgrounds. The start of the walk flies by as you hear stories of their own experiences and adventures in China. By the time you arrive at the Half-Way hostel, after 6 hours of climbing, battling the 28 turns, and crossing waterfalls, there is a high chance you will have bonded with your fellow hikers!

The Half-Way hostel not only has great food but spectacular views from the hostel dorms. This is where we spent Christmas Eve!

Day 6: The Descent

The next day, you will begin a 2-hour descent down the mountain to Tina’s hostel where your luggage has been kept. If you have time, I would recommend going down the to see the Gorge, before the bus departs back to Lijiang at 15:30. This walk takes approximately 2 hours, it is very beautiful and a cool opportunity to hear  the extraordinary loud roar of the river and to climb up steep ladders!

Option: If you have an extra day or so, I would suggest boarding the bus from Tina’s to the Shangri-La area. From there one can either return to Lijiang or travel a little further north and catch a flight back from Dujing Airport. This region reflects the scenery without incurring the cost of entering Tibet!

 

Once back in Lijiang, take the overnight train back to Kunming. If you are pushed for time, you can take a flight from Lijiang to Qingdao, however, these flights are expensive and aren’t direct.

I can not recommend this trip enough! Even for a short time, it was great to travel to a different Chinese province to experience a different climate, culture and food. If my pictures don’t convince you, then have a look at the warm average temperature for December and January!

Average Temperature in Lijiang
Average Temperature in Lijiang

 

Do you feel inspired to travel from Qingdao to Yunnan? Apply now! 

Chengdu Blogs, Chengdu InternChina events, Eating Out in Chengdu

Weekend Trip to Wenshu Monastery

Wenshu Monastery

This weekend in Chengdu our interns took a visit to the famous Wenshu Monastery. Upon arrival, the beauty of the buildings stunned us. From the towering peace pagoda to the stunning halls, the architecture amazed us all.

Wenshu Gardens

Upon entering the monastery, you notice its layout in the traditional Chinese style. Wenshu is made of 5 south facing halls in a row leading up to the stunning main hall at the far end from the entrance. In classic Chinese style there was maintenance underway including this man precariously perched atop scaffolding on wheels using a jet wash to clean the beams.

Maintenance worker at Wenshu Temple

Having toured the grounds of the monastery we headed outside to an antiques market. Here we found old communist memorabilia, including the famous little red book,  and Mao-ist propaganda amongst other treasures. One vendor was sat outside his shop playing his guitar as his dog kept an eye on the passers by.

Antiques Vendor and his watch dog

After looking around the monastery and the antiques market we headed back towards the temple grounds in search of some food.

The Food

The surrounding area to the monastery is home to some of the most famous food in Sichuan. Not ones to miss the opportunity to eat, we jumped in the line of a famous restaurant. The restaurant was packed full with no space to sit. Upon ordering our TianShuiMian (this restaurants famous dish) we managed to find a spot to sit and dug into to this amazing delicacy. Our interns loved the sweet and spicy contrast to these amazing hand made noodles!

TianShuiMian

After sampling this delight we wanted more and headed to another famous spot near the metro station. As is the case with all well-known eateries in China, this place also had a queue out the front. This time we were queuing for Guo Kui. The menu offered Beef, Pork, Pig’s Snout, Pigs Ear, Noodles and other delights to fill this delightful pastry pocket. I personally chose the pig’s snout, which didn’t disappoint.

GuoKui in Chengdu

Having filled our stomachs with great food and our eyes with fantastic scenery we all headed off. On the way back we stopped by Tianfu Square, right in the middle of the city to snap some pictures and take in our surroundings. All in all a great day out!

Interested in visiting Wenshu Monastery and trying some Sichuan cuisine? Apply now!

Chengdu Blogs, China Business Blogs

Internship Experience – From Perth to Chengdu

Written by Claire Sadler 

From the most isolated city in the world to one of the largest cities in China

Coming from the remote city of Perth, Australia I thought interning in Chengdu would be the perfect opportunity to experience a different lifestyle.

Although when I first arrived, the difference between my coastal life and bustling Chengdu definitely gave me culture shock, this soon subsided with the excitement of being exposed to such an amazing place.

I have only been here for a month but in that time I have already made enough friends to freeload on almost every continent, eaten my weight in Sichuan cuisine and explored many parts of this beautiful city!

Experiening Chinese culture in Chengdu

Exploring Chengdu

In an attempt to explore as much as possible during my stay, I have seen so much of what Chengdu has to offer. Some of the highlights have been the infamous pandas, Dongmen Bridge, the Leshan Giant Buddha and People’s Park.

Exploring the parks in Chengdu

One funny experience of my trip though was how excited the locals at Sanxingdui Museum were when they saw Dominique and I. A crowd of at least 20 people asked for pictures because they had never seen a foreigner there before! All I could think about was how they would have shown everyone the pictures of us.

Seeing pandas at the Chengdu panda research base

My Internship

During my stay in Chengdu I’m situated in Gaoshengqiao, known for the Tibetan culture. It is crazy how even doing day to day tasks I am exposed to this culture, as I even see monks shopping in Walmart!

In terms of my placement I am completing a marketing internship with Inspiration Tech. It has been an amazing opportunity to learn new marketing skills, specifically how to effectively promote a product and create advertisements. I have also gotten the opportunity to write articles and conduct interviews, which has boosted my experience in journalism.

Internship activities with Inspiration Tech

The whole trip has been eye opening, inspiring and rewarding in so many ways. Interning in Chengdu was definitely a once in a lifetime experience that I will never forget!

Do you want to experience Chengdu for yourself? Then apply now!

Chengdu Blogs, Chengdu Business, Chengdu InternChina events, Eating Out in Chengdu

Internship Experience – Sylvia in Chengdu

Written by Sylvia Liu 
It’s been a bit over a month now since I first began my internship experience in Chengdu with InternChina, and I can easily say that this experience is definitely one that will be remembered!

The City

Having travelled to many other Chinese cities before, Chengdu is a breath of fresh air; not literally however, but rather in the sense of its pace of life.

Chengdu meanders peacefully through each day; while other cities rush and are filled with spontaneity. That’s not to say Chengdu is less developed economically, quite the contrary! Just as its numerous shopping centres, nightlife and still expanding public transport systems like to prove.

Chengdu Panda Research Panda Base

Personally I have found the pace of life charming. I have enjoyed spending my Sundays temple-seeing, sipping tea at monasteries, and nibbling on sunflower seeds while listening to the indistinct chatter of Sichuanese.

Food has also held a prominent role in my time here! You will be hard pressed to find a restaurant who won’t serve at least a bowl of chilli with the famous Sichuan Peppercorns along with your meal.

Internship experience and exploring Chengdu

The old streets of Chengdu, the majority located in the inner South West of the city, are a delight to walk through. There is plenty of opportunity to snack on the delicious street food, while being surrounded by traditional architecture permeating with historical significance.

The Internship

I believe that there is knowledge that can only be learned from doing an internship in China. In particular cultural proficiency, which is always a handy skill to have even if one does not pursue a career in international business.

Some of the more interesting tasks I’ve done at the company have included researching the potential of incorporating blockchain technology with gaming, as well as game testing for current beta projects.

The employees at the company are all very inclusive, and it is interesting to gain insight into general Chinese organisational culture. The food options available at lunch are an additional highlight of the workday. The local 7-Eleven is frequented often for its lunchtime pick-and-mix boxes!

Intern activities

The People

The people I have met in Chengdu have been the best part of my internship yet. Being able to meet people from all over the world through my internship in Chengdu is something I’m grateful for. I always look forward to spending time with the other interns or going to events organised by InternChina, such as Thursday Dinner, or even weekend activities outside the city.

InternChina Chengdu Thursday dinner

I can say with no doubt that it is the people I have met here that make this trip the enjoyable experience it has been!

Interested in seeing everything that Sylvia has during her time in Chengdu? Then apply now!

All You Need to Know, Chinese traditions, Eating Out in Chengdu, Eating out in Zhuhai, Events in Qingdao, Food, How-to Guides, Learn about China, Qingdao Eating Out Guide

How to Read a Chinese Menu

As you may know, in China food is one of the most important things! Indeed, sharing a meal is a social opportunity that is loved across China. However, reading a Chinese menu can seem intimidating.
At InternChina we love food too – check out this blog in order to know more about how we help you to explore Chinese cuisine. If you have never tried Chinese food before, don’t worry, you’ll definitely experience this soon enough!

And fear not, this article is here to hopefully help you understand a Chinese menu, so you can order yourself and impress your Chinese colleagues and friends!

The Chinese language may appear to be the most difficult language in the world at first, as we are not used to the Chinese characters. But don’t be intimidated! This ancient language is following a certain logic – as soon as you understand the logic, you’ll be able to read a Chinese menu without a doubt!

To avoid giving you a long history lesson, let’s just say that originally all Chinese characters were created using pictures, and were developed into the calligraphic style that we see today through several different steps.

History of Chinese Characters

Let me show you the evolution of the Chinese character for “horse” – if you don’t want to order this kind of dish, just look for it in a Chinese menu!

Now that you can understand how the Chinese characters work, just use your imagination and it will be way easier to read a menu! Let me show you some examples of the main ingredients you’ll find in a Chinese menu.

Meat on the Menu

These are basically the most common kinds of meat you’ll find on a menu in China. While horse meat isn’t that popular, in some places donkey meat is! Therefore, for donkey meat dishes you will have the character for horse, and one other symbol that looks similar to the tall ears of the donkey! So a donkey is a horse with tall ears, easy to remember- right? Can you find two more very similar characters? When you understand that the Chinese language is logic, it seems less and less hard, right?

After most of those characters in a Chinese menu you’ll see “肉-rou” that means “meat”.

Vegetables on the Menu

Obviously, the Chinese language can’t always be explained by pictures, but you can still see the logic behind the characters.

Let’s look at “potato” as an example. “Tu” means “earth“, and “dou” means “bean“. A potato is a bean that comes from the earth – easy!

Another interesting story can be found with “tomato.” Tomatoes weren’t originally found in China, they were imported. So in the Chinese name for tomato we have: “Xi” meaning “West“, “Hong” meaning “Red“, and “Shi” meaning “Persimmons“. Can you guess why? Because a tomato looks like a “red-persimmon imported from the West”! Clever, right?

Bai” means “white” and “Cai” means vegetable, so the white vegetable is also know as the delicious Chinese cabbage! The easiest way to remember a Chinese character is to make a story from the shape of the character, or ask your Chinese friends to explain the character to you!

Main Dishes

These are the main characters you’ll see in the dishes, so you’ll see if you are going to eat soup or some noodles.

Just one thing to remember about rice, restaurants commonly use “米饭” or just “饭” – character FAN–  for rice. And a funny tip about “egg”- “dan” means egg, but in Chinese you’ll always call it a “Chicken egg”.

For the soup “tang” can you see the three dots on the left hand-side ? Looks like drops of water, right? Exactly! That’s the way of describing an object or dish with water inside, so now you all know that there is water in the soup now!

Our Favourite Dishes

Now that we’ve showed you the main characters you’ll see in a Chinese menu, let’s give you some more tips and the names of our favourite dishes!

These might take some more imagination to remember, as it won’t be as easy as the characters for various animals which were very close to the actual picture of the animal. However, these cards will be super useful while reading a Chinese menu. And, you can also show them in the restaurants if you can’t find them on the Chinese menu!

Don’t hesitate to choose those dishes if you see them on a Chinese menu, they’re delicious!

You can find the two first ones in every Halal restaurant, also known in Chinese as “Lanzhou Lamian, “and you can recognise these restaurants by the characters on the outside door: ‘兰州拉面‘. And the other dishes are found in any typical Chinese restaurant!

  • XiHongshi Chao Jidan: Egg and tomato with rice.
  • Jidan Chao Dao Xiao Mian: Fried egg, vegetables and cut noodles (this might be little spicy in some places!)
  • Feng Wei Qie Zi : Fried aubergines.
  • Tang Cu li Ji: Sweet and sour pork.
  • Gan bian Da tou Cai : “Big head vegetable!” This will be some delicious Chinese cabbage and spicy sauce.
  • Gong Bao Ji Ding : Chicken, peanuts and veggies, with a sweet and spicy sauce.

Please Don’t Forget!

Here some tips, that may save you one day – who knows!

  • If a character has on the left-hand side it is likely to be some sort of guts/intestines/belly/insides, i.e. run in the opposite direction!
  • Are you a vegetarian or vegan? Then always avoid meals with this character ““, as this is “rou“, which means “meat.”
  • Allergic to peanuts? This is the character you need to avoid : “花生“, pronounced “huasheng.”
  • If you can’t eat spicy food, avoid this red one! “La” “” means spicy.

There is different kind of spicy food that our interns in Chengdu will be pleased to try! When you see those characters : be ready to experience some tingling and numbing sensation.

Don’t hesitate to ask our staff members on place to help you out with the pronunciation, or if you need any help ordering your food!

Did this help to convince you that living in China isn’t that difficult? Well then, you just need to apply now!

Comment lire une carte au restaurant
Articles en français

Comment commander au restaurant si on ne comprend pas la carte?

Comme vous le savez surement, en Chine la nourriture c’est sacré! En effet, partager un repas entre amis ou collègues est une des activités favorites partout en Chine. Cependant, pour nous étrangers, lire une carte dans un restaurant reste très intimidant.
Chez InternChina ,on adore la nourriture – lisez ce blog si vous voulez comprendre comment nous allons vous aider à découvrir la cuisine chinoise. Si vous n’avez jamais gouté la nourriture chinoise avant de venir, ne vous en faites pas, cette expérience sera l’occasion rêvée!

N’ayez crainte, cet article est là pour vous aider à déchiffrer une carte , afin de commander par vous même et d’impressionner vos collègues et amis chinois!

La langue chinoise semble être la plus difficile dans le monde à première vue, en effet nous n’avions jamais utilisé de caractères pour écrire! Mais n’ayez pas peur! Cette très ancienne langue à été crée selon une certaine logique. Une fois que vous aurez compris cette logique il sera bien plus simple de déchiffrer une carte au restaurant!

Je vais vous épargner une longue leçon d’histoire, disons simplement qu’à l’origine tous les caractères chinois ont été crées à partir de dessins, qui après plusieurs étapes sont devenus les caractères que l’on connait aujourd’hui.

L’évolution des caractères chinois

Laissez moi vous montrer l’évolution des caractères chinois avec par exemple le mot Cheval. Cela pourra vous être utile au restaurant si vous ne voulez pas commander cela!

Vous voyez comment ça marche ? Avec un peu d’imagination il vous sera facile de lire une carte au restaurant. Je vais maintenant vous présenter les caractères principaux que vous retrouverez dans toutes les cartes dans les restaurants en Chine.

Viande à la carte

Voici les principales sortes de viandes que vous trouverez en Chine sur une carte. Même si la viande de cheval est très impopulaire en Chine, l’âne en revanche est très en vogue! Pour reconnaître le caractère de l’âne, souvenez vous de celui du cheval, et ajoutez y une partie qui pourrait ressemble à de grandes oreilles. Après tout, un âne ressemble à un cheval avec de longues oreilles non? Pouvez-vous voir des similitudes dans deux autres caractères ? C’est exactement ce dont je parlais quand je parlais de logique, une fois que vous l’avez comprise c’est plus simple non?

N’oubliez pas, après ces différents caractères vous trouverez  “肉-rou” qui signifie “viande”.

Légumes à la carte

Effectivement, la langue chinoise ne peut pas toujours être expliquée selon des dessins. On ne vous a pas menti le chinois c’est compliqué, mais toujours très logique! Je vais vous expliquer:

Regardons le caractère pour “pomme de terre” par exemple. . “Tu” signifie “terre“, et “dou” signifie “graine“. Une pomme de terre est bien une graine qui pousse dans la terre – facile non ?

Une autre histoire intéressante dans le mot chinois pour “tomate.” Si vous ne le saviez pas les tomates ont été importés en Chine il y a longtemps. Donc quand il a fallu trouver un mot pour tomate on a utilisé :”Xi” pour “Ouest“, “Hong” pour “Rouge“, et “Shi” pour “Kakis“. Pouvez-vous deviner pourquoi? Car une tomate ressemble à un “kaki rouge importé de l’ouest en Chine”. Super logique non ?

Bai” signifie “white” et “Cai” signifie vegetable, donc le délicieux chou chinoix n’est autre que le légume blanc. Le meilleur moyen de se souvenir d’un caractère chinois et d’essayer d’inventer une histoire selon sa forme comme moyen mémo-technique. Ou demandez à vos amis chinois de vous en expliquer le sens!

Principaux ingrédients à la carte

Envie de manger du riz ou des pâtes aujourd’hui? Voici donc les principaux caractères présent à la carte en Chine.

Une chose à savoir pour le riz en Chine, sur la carte on utilisera plutôt le caractère  “米饭” ou simplement “饭” –  FAN– pour parler d’un plat avec du riz. Et pour les œufs, si  “dan” signifie en lui même œuf, en chinois on appellera toujours cela “un œuf de poule”.

Pour les soupes “tang” vous voyez la partie à gauche avec trois points ? Cela ressemble à des gouttes d’eau non? Exactement! Ces trois traits sont utilisés dans tous les caractères représentant quelque chose contenant de l’eau. L’eau étant un des éléments principaux dans la soupe ou bouillon, c’est là encore très logique.

Nos plats préférés à la carte

Maintenant que vous êtes devenus un expert en nourriture chinoise, voici nos recommandations à la carte en Chine.

Là encore, usez de votre imagination pour vous souvenir des noms entiers, mais reconnaître la majorité des ingrédients vous aidera à savoir ce que vous commandez. N’hésitez pas à imprimer ces images afin de les montrer au serveur si vous avez peur de ne pas vous en souvenir! Même si vous ne reconnaissez pas ces plats sur la carte, cela ne coûte rien d’essayer, ce sont des plats typiques qui n’ont même pas besoin de figurer sur une carte au restaurant.

Un conseil, testez les tous, ce sont des plats absolument délicieux!

Les deux premiers sont nos plats préférés que l’on trouve dans tous les restaurants Halal, aussi connu sous le nom de “Lanzhou Lamian“. Afin de trouver ces restaurants – ils sont à chaque coin de rue – essayer de trouver ces caractères sur la devanture : ‘兰州拉面‘. Pour les autres plats, partout ailleurs vous devriez pouvoir les commander!

  • XiHongshi Chao Jidan: Morceaux d’omelette et tomates avec du riz
  • Jidan Chao Dao Xiao Mian: Morceaux d’omelette, légumes et des pâtes coupées (attention parfois la sauce est piquante).
  • Feng Wei Qie Zi : Aubergines frites
  • Tang Cu li Ji: Porc frit sauce aigre douce
  • Gan bian Da Tou Cai : “Le légume qui ressemble à une grosse tête!”Ce drôle de nom décrit un délicieux plat de chou chinois épicé.
  • Gong Bao Ji Ding : Poulet, légumes et cacahuètes, à la sauce sucrée ou épicée selon les restaurants.

Important – à retenir!

Voici quelques conseils à retenir, ils pourraient vous sauver la vie un jour – qui sait!

  • Si le caractère à ceci à gauche, cela sera certainement les intestins, foie ou autres abats. Suivez mon conseil fuyez – sauf si vous êtes fan!
  • Végétarien ou végétaliens? Evitez donc ce caractère ““, car “rou“, signifie “viande.”
  • Allergie aux cacahuètes ou arachides? Évitez ce caractère : “花生“, que l’on prononce “huasheng.”
  • Pas fan des plats épicés, alors fuyez celui ci : “La” “” , et tout ce qui est très rouge sur les photos dans la carte!

Il existe cependant différentes sortes de plats épicés et nos futures stagiaires de Chengdu auront l’occasion de vous en dire plus! Si vous voyez ces caractères : 麻辣 – prononcés Mala – soyez prêts à expérimenter une sensation très étrange en bouche… Vous ne sentirez surement plus vos lèvres et votre langue pour un moment! Ne vous en faites pas, cela reviendra vite !

N’hésitez pas à demander à notre équipe sur place de vous aider avec la prononciation, ou si vous avez besoin d’aide pour commander!

Cet article vous a-t-il convaincu de venir vivre une expérience hors du commun en Chine? N’attendez plus et postulez!

Cultural, Discover Chinese culture, Learn about China, Things To Do in Zhuhai, Zhuhai Blogs

PMSA New Zealand – Zhuhai Cultural Programme

by Nick Goldstein  

Two Week PMSA Language and Culture Programme

PMSA zhuahi

I’m not a very good writer, but when asked to write a piece on my first two weeks in Zhuhai as part of the PMSA Programme I volunteered. Not only because I want to get better, but because coming here under InternChina’s culture and internship program taught me the value of doing things you are scared of. That’s why I ended up here writing about InternChina’s program, having already wasted the first 60 words.

The first two weeks were packed! My personal highlights were tea making, calligraphy and Tai Chi classes. Although lots of fun, I also learned a lot. Much like learning about the history of your country helps you understand it today, learning about the details of Chinese culture helped me understand the big picture (it’s a really big picture!)

During this time, we visited two companies operating in the free trade zone. In the same way as our cultural activities, learning about the companies taught me not only about the company itself, its processes and operations, but also the way western firms interact with Chinese. I saw two models, although on the surface very similar, in practice very different, and I felt the difference. If I were to set up an operation in China, I know what I would do differently.

Language Classes

Part of the program was two weeks of intensive language classes. 3 hours a day in a room with other kiwis trying to learn Chinese was invaluable, and although my Chinese is not comprehensive, it is enough to make a contribution to the language gap. In China, at least where I am, the effort is more appreciated than required.

Homestay Experience

The third part of the program was the homestay experience. Make no mistake this was an experience, living with my own family was difficult enough, someone else’s is downright terrifying. Despite this, however, the most valuable aspect of the course was the homestay. Visiting companies and learning about culture is useful, but you only learn so much by teaching. Living in a homestay opened me up to the culture, exposing me to the intricacies.

Examples of what I have learnt are 1. That, at least in my family, no matter how loud your child’s friend is screaming, you don’t tell them off and 2. People really don’t like it when you wear shoes in the house, like REALLY don’t like it!

homestay

What I’ve Learnt

Jokes aside, I learned about the details of the culture, and I have made friends that I will take back to New Zealand. Reflecting on the past fortnight I think the most valuable thing I have learnt are soft skills. Cultural appreciation, empathy, an understanding of the Chinese approach, and an ability to work in Chinese culture, as well as, I believe, an improved ability to work with any culture. I think the friends, contacts and memories I have made are all important. Overwhelmingly, however, participating in this program has been mostly beneficial to my appreciation of different cultures, expanding my mindset.

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